High Society

High Society


Vinyl

Once bought, this item cannot be cancelled or returned.

Get informed when this item is in stock by using our Personal Agent from the right.

sold Out of print / Out of stock.

Feature
Version
Vinyl

Once bought, this item cannot be cancelled or returned.

Get informed when this item is in stock by using our Personal Agent from the right.
sold Out of print / Out of stock


save for later

Track it down!

This item is currently unavailable. If you are interested in buying it, we can try to track it down for you.To have us tracking down your wanted items, we need you to login or create an account

further info

Official Release Date Jan 27, 2009
Artist Enon
Genre Pop
Version  US
PAX-Code PAX0005008268
Item Code  0036172093519

features

  • Manufacturer: Touch & Go

track listing

1. Old Dominion2. Count Sheep3. In This City4. Window Display5. Native Numb6. Leave It To Rust7. Disposable Parts8. Sold!9. Shoulder10. Pleasure and Privelige11. Natural Disasters12. Carbonation13. Salty14. High Society15. Diamond Raft

description

Enon's second album, High Society, is something of a homecoming for the band. Dave Sardy's See-Thru label issued their debut, Believo!, but for their follow-up, the group moved to Touch & Go, the home of John Schmersal's former band Brainiac, as well as that of Blonde Redhead, of whom Toko Yasuda used to be a member. Similarly, High Society sounds like a more focused combination of Brainiac's spastic geek-rock and Blonde Redhead's more delicate, poppy moments. Though they may be more focused, Enon will never be straightforward, but that's one of the band's, and album's, strengths. In the first four songs alone, High Society spans the driving, garagey rock of "Old Dominion," the weirdly brooding "Count Sheep," "In This City"'s sleek synth pop, and the jangly cuteness of "Window Display," which sounds like a cross between Preston School of Industry and Magnetic Fields. Believo! was also admirably eclectic, but High Society is both more versatile, and more successful in its versatility, than Enon's debut. A large part of this is due to the addition of Yasuda, whose voice and synths add a new dimension to the band's sound, particularly on showcases like the pretty, and pretty weird, new wave buzz of "Disposable Parts" and "Shoulder." Solid songwriting also anchors High Society's sonic trickery effectively, making it interesting decoration instead of the album's main attraction; relatively poppy tracks like "Sold!" and "Natural Disasters" sit pretty comfortably next to the wigged-out "Native Numb" and "Pleasure and Privilege," which should satisfy any Enon fans looking for a fix of Brainiac-like freakiness. Equally impressive, though, is the album's title track, which gives a playful nod in the direction of the Left Banke and the Kinks at their chamber-poppiest. Just as expansive and experimental as it is streamlined and melodic, on High Society Enon's contradictory style makes perfect sense.

recommendations

useful links


Missing links?

Please log in or create account to submit your link recommendations.

customer reviews

No reviews for High Society yet.

Log in or create account to post your own reviews.

personal agent

Please send me an E-Mail when ...




Our privacy statement

tell a friend

Tell your friends about us. Enter as many E-Mail addresses as you like (separated by ";").

Please login first

Our privacy statement



SN: 225 | 1007 { 58 } | | WS: 1 | | Cat: 2093